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South Dakota
South DakotaSouth Dakota is 5th in the U.S. in wind energy potential, so expectations for the wind industry in the Mount Rushmore State are high.1
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
It only has 803 megawatts of wind energy capacity currently installed,2
Source:
American Wind Energy Association, January 2015
http://bit.ly/1CATYcP
which may not sound like a lot, given the significant potential of the state. But that means wind is responsible for over 26% of the state’s electricity generation portfolio.3
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1BQFwZO


Wind power isn’t the only renewable source of energy that contributes significantly to the state’s electricity portfolio. In fact, hydropower is the state’s #1 source of electricity; 65% of the state’s electricity comes from wind and hydro.4
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, December 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1FTzhvV
South Dakota is also the 5th largest producer of ethanol in the country.5
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, December 2014
http://1.usa.gov/195JyXA


The growth of the state’s renewable energy industry has been slightly tempered by the minimal amount of pro-renewable state policies.5 But still, the future of South Dakota’s clean energy economy is bright.

Learn more about energy in South Dakota with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Tennessee
TennesseeTennessee was an early adopter of renewable energy and is the home of the first major windfarm in the Southeastern U.S.1
Source:
WBIR, December 2013
http://on.wbir.com/1F2ctHr
Tennessee also has an extensive hydropower industry, and it now gets over 10% of its electricity from renewable sources, one of the highest proportions in the southeastern U.S.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/1I0ljpf


Unfortunately, the state is also one of the (very) few states without a renewable portfolio standard or net-metering policy, and that has stunted the growth of Tennessee’s clean energy growth.3 Still, the state’s preeminent utility, the Tennessee Valley Authority, has made acquiring more renewable energy a priority.4
Source:
Tennessee Valley Authority
http://1.usa.gov/1D7YLFc
And the Tennessee Regulatory Authority just approved a transmission project that will deliver wind energy from Oklahoma across the southeast and inject $2 billion of investment into Tennessee.5
Source:
Memphis Business Journal, January 2015
http://bit.ly/1Nmpc9S


Learn more about energy in Tennessee with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.

Texas

TexasTexas is an energy-centric state any way you slice it. The state both produces and consumes the most energy in the United States, has its own completely independent grid, and leads the country in both natural gas production and crude oil production.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1Nl9uxA
However, the Lone Star State also leads the U.S. in wind energy generation by a significant margin, and its wind industry is an international powerhouse.

Texas has over 12,000 megawatts of wind power capacity currently installed, and it is expected to add 7,000 megawatts by the end of this year.2
Source:
Dallas Morning News, April 2014
http://bit.ly/1F2GA1l
To put that in perspective, Texas is already the 6th largest country for wind energy capacity in the world.3 And all of that wind energy brings real economic benefits to the state: wind power support nearly 9,000 jobs in Texas.4
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/19rfHZo


Texas’ other renewable power sectors have been slower to take off, despite significant potential in geothermal, solar, biomass, and offshore wind.5
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
And since the state has already met its renewable portfolio standard, these clean energy sectors may remain largely under-utilized moving forward.6
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1bDM8FJ


Learn more about energy in Texas with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Utah
UtahWith significant solar and geothermal potential, a net-metering policy in place, favorable tax incentives and programs in effect, and swaths of open land, Utah is in position to create jobs, diversify its energy portfolio, and reduce its reliance on electricity sources from out-of-state with clean energy.

The Beehive State's entirely voluntary renewable portfolio standard has constrained growth in the past, but things are starting to pick up. In 2014, renewable projects in the state attracted $264.3 million in asset finance.1
Source:
American Council On Renewable Energy, November 2015
http://bit.ly/1QpqN4L
Utah has 615 megawatts of utility-scale solar currently being developed--an amount that would increase Utah’s solar capacity by a whopping 3,416%.2
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1972Dsg
Those projects will begin to come online by next year. The state also has 13 geothermal projects under development,3
Source:
Geothermal Energy Association, April 2014
http://bit.ly/1E3GvaI
and was recently ranked by NREL as having the 25th highest wind energy potential in the U.S.4
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE


Learn more about energy in Utah with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Vermont
VermontVermont has a thriving and diverse renewable energy industry – 30% of its electricity comes from renewables, and the state boasts the lowest carbon emissions from the electricity generation sector in the country.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1xlYMTz


A majority of the state’s renewable energy comes from hydropower, but it also has significant biomass capacity.2
Source:
American Council On Renewable Energy, June 2014
http://bit.ly/1F2LNGi
On top of that, the solar industry supports 1,000 jobs in the state,3
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1EKJjtM
and Vermont can use wind energy to meet 1/4th of its electricity needs without a large commitment of land.4
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1OHhLgS
Burlington – the largest city in Vermont – has already shifted entirely to renewable power.5
Source:
PBS, January 2015
http://to.pbs.org/1HIEEiX


The state also has a vibrant efficiency sector. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy ranked Vermont third in the country for pro-efficiency policies.6
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, October 2014
http://bit.ly/1CutQAZ
And there is a goal in place that expects 20% of the electricity added to the grid after 2004 by Vermont utilities to come from renewable sources.7
Source:
DSIRE, September 2014
http://bit.ly/1Cuvgez


Learn more about energy in Vermont with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Virginia
VirginiaVirginia has a renewable portfolio standard as well as an energy efficiency standard, but both are voluntary, and the state’s renewable energy industry has stalled out as a result.1
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1GynTEB
Virginia only got 5.5% of its electricity from renewable sources in 2013.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1NnaS0T


Still, the Commonwealth has ample renewable resources to take advantage of. In order to boost the state’s solar industry and begin to take advantage of the sort of benefits currently being enjoyed by neighbor North Carolina, Governor McAuliffe has argued for the creation of the Virginia Solar Development Authority.3
Source:
WHSV, January 2015
http://bit.ly/1Bv6XbE
And an offshore wind industry in Virginia would create 5,161 more jobs than a prospective offshore drilling industry.4
Source:
Oceana, January 2015
http://bit.ly/1Gyoqqm
According to NREL, the state has offshore wind resources totaling 89 gigawatts of capacity.5
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE


Virginia does have a successful agricultural industry, and over half of the state’s renewable energy comes from biomass facilities. In fact, older coal plants nearing retirement offer the opportunity to continue generating electricity by converting to biomass. Dominion Power has already converted three of its Virginia coal plants to biomass.6
Source:
Dominion Power
http://bit.ly/1G1a3tR


Learn more about energy in Virginia with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Washington
WashingtonThere’s no doubt that Washington is a clean energy powerhouse: the state leads the U.S. in renewable energy generation, and more than 75% of its electricity comes from renewables.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, June 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1xHRKJo
In fact, it generates nearly 1/3rd of the nation’s hydropower,2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, June 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1F2ToVn
and it is also among the nation’s leader in wind energy.3
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1FVfPPo


All of that renewable energy is a large part of the reason the state has the cheapest electricity prices in country.4
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/1NnfDaA
And there’s still plenty of renewable resources left to develop. According to the Department of Energy, Washington has over 7 GW of untapped hydropower,5
Source:
U.S. Department of Energy, April 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1CiodEt
not to mention its abundant wave, ocean, and geothermal resources. The state’s solar industry supports 2,400 jobs in-state,6
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1IGg4Mg
and it has significant offshore wind potential.7
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE


Learn more about energy in Washington with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
West Virginia
West VirginiaCoal reigns in West Virginia, one of only three states that are net-exporters of coal.1
Source:
Union of Concerned Scientists, August 2014
http://bit.ly/1zBUqpw
Coal accounts for 95% of West Virginia’s electricity portfolio, and a majority of that electricity is sent out-of-state.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1OHz9C2


West Virgnia did have some semblance of a renewable portfolio standard: it required 25% of West Virginia’s electricity to come from renewable and alternative sources by 2025. But the “alternative” part of the equation allowed WV utilities to meet the standard with non-renewable, non-clean sources of electricity like natural gas and certain coal technologies.3
Source:
West Virginia Legislature
http://bit.ly/1MeIi6k
Apparently, even that modest standard was too harsh: West Virginia repealed its alternative energy standard earlier this year.4
Source:
West Virginia Metro News, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1OHB6yk


The decision to double-down on coal is perplexing: a recent leak of chemicals used to purify coal left 300,000 West Virginians without fresh water.5
Source:
The Atlantic, January 2015
http://theatln.tc/1a1A68L
And without a backup plan, the declining demand for coal will continue to limit economic opportunity for state residents.6
Source:
Washington Post, August 2014
http://wapo.st/1CGa5Uf


Learn more about energy in West Virginia with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Wisconsin
WisconsinWisconsin is a top 10 producer of ethanol,1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, February 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1ylD515
has plenty of renewable resources to take advantage of, and features a slew of policies meant to encourage clean energy generation. Transitioning to renewables is crucial for a state that sends $840 million out-of-state every year in order to import coal.2
Source:
Union of Concerned Scientists, August 2014
http://bit.ly/1zBUqpw


Wisconsin has all the pieces in place to rapidly ramp up its wind deployment. Although wind energy only makes up 2.4% of the state’s electricity portfolio, the state has enough wind resources to meet 400% of its current energy needs. Plus, Wisconsin has 26 manufacturing facilities that create wind turbine components, the second-most in the country.3
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1xHVyKH


The home of the Green Bay Packers has plenty of pro-renewable policies, including a renewable portfolio standard mandates that the state get 10% of its electricity from renewables by the end of this year. That’s not much, but it also mandates that each utility keep its portion of renewables from falling below 2015 levels.4
Source:
DSIRE, October 2014
http://bit.ly/1G1iFkl
The state also features some tax incentives for renewables and requires that state utilities spend a certain amount of revenue on renewable energy and energy efficiency each year.5
Source:
American Council On Renewable Energy, October 2013
http://bit.ly/1HUpRRr


Learn more about energy in Wisconsin with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Wyoming
WyomingWyoming has substantial fossil fuel resources – it produces the most coal in the nation, and it is also a leader in natural gas and crude oil production.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, August 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1xHWy1d
Even so, the state has the 8th highest potential for wind energy,2
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
and its wind industry has shown signs of growth.

The largest proposed wind farm in North America (3 GW) is nearing construction, and the project is economically viable regardless of the status of the federal production tax credit.3
Source:
’Casper Star Tribune, August 2014
http://bit.ly/1D9bw2n
And a recently revealed plan for an $8 billion wind project that would generate wind power in Wyoming, store it in Utah, and deliver it to California has been called the “Hoover Dam” of wind energy.4
Source:
Casper Star Tribune, September 2014
http://bit.ly/1GyGTTv


However, the state is the only one in the nation that has an exclusive tax on wind power generation, and this policy has stifled investment in the state.5
Source:
Casper Star Tribune, March 2013
http://bit.ly/1FwvZxX
As long as the wind tax remains, Wyoming’s ability to take advantage of its wind potential is in doubt.

Learn more about energy in Wyoming with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Alaska
AlaskaAlaska has some of the highest electricity and gasoline prices in the nation,1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/17E2Vq3
largely due to its remote location and excessive reliance on crude oil for electricity generation – in 2014, 13% of the state’s electricity came from petroleum fuels. Currently, Alaska has not established an RPS policy.

However, the state also has significant renewable energy resources: 25% of Alaska’s electricity comes from hydropower.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1LRHr6n
 

Plus, many towns rely on biomass plants to supplement their diesel fuel generators,3
Source:
American Council On Renewable Energy, September 2014
http://bit.ly/1C5mtkq
and Alaska’s plethora of small-scale microgrids offer an obvious opportunity for increased distributed renewable energy deployment.

Learn more about energy in Alaska with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Arizona
ArizonaThanks to its vast expanse of open land and intense sunlight,1
Source:
Arizona Solar Center
http://bit.ly/1Gvw6XY
Arizona’s solar potential is among the highest in the U.S. In fact, Arizona added the second most solar power in the U.S. in 2013,2
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1Cy9ebo
and the state’s solar industry supports over 9,200 direct jobs.3
Source:
The Solar Foundation, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1I2eJ20


Fittingly, the state is home to both the largest photovoltaic solar plant in the world, as well as Solana, a concentrated solar panel plant that powers 70,000 homes and uses molten salt storage technology to continue to generate power even after the sun goes down.4
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, November 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1BU20wf
In total, different solar and wind projects in the state attracted $413.6 million in private-sector investment during 2014.5
Source:
American Council On Renewable Energy, November 2015
http://bit.ly/1Qpe3ez


Arizona has also been a hot-spot in the battle over net-metering policies. In 2013, a heated debate pitted former Congressman Barry Goldwater, Jr.’s “Tell Utilities Solar won’t be Killed” against Arizona utilities seeking a $50-$100 monthly charge for rooftop solar owners.6
Source:
Mother Jones, July 2013
http://bit.ly/1H7cBZm
Arizona regulatory officials rejected that, but did agree to an average $5.00 monthly charge for rooftop solar owners, making it the first state in the U.S. to place a charge on rooftop solar owners. The growth of solar in the state has slowed as a result.7
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association, March 2015
http://bit.ly/1DCXpSJ


Learn more about energy in Arizona with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Arkansas
ArkansasDespite its reputation as “The Natural State,” Arkansas has no utility-scale solar or wind energy projects currently in operation. In fact, it relies on coal imports to generate about half of its electricity, which means the state sends over $600 million out-of-state every year.1
Source:
Union of Concerned Scientists, January 2014
http://bit.ly/1Fam0P6
Virtually all of its non-hydro renewable energy generation, equal to 2% of its electricity capacity, comes from biomass plants.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1I2jKry


A net-metering policy and related interconnection standard have helped the state’s distributed solar industry gain a (very) small foothold. And tax credits for the manufacture of wind turbine components have attracted 11 companies to the state.3
Source:
Southeastern Wind Coalition, December 2014
http://bit.ly/1MO5MvZ
Plus, an energy efficiency resource standard, combined with state loans that allow businesses to use electricity savings as repayment, earned Arkansas recognition as one of the most improved for the energy efficiency industry in 2014.4
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
http://bit.ly/1xkjsLZ


Learn more about energy in Arkansas with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Colorado
ColoradoA renewable portfolio standard that calls for state utilities to derive 30% of their electricity from renewable sources by 2020, coupled with a strong net-metering policy, has helped Colorado’s renewable energy industry take off in recent years. The state currently gets 14% of its electricity from non-hydro renewables, and 3% more from hydropower.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, August 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1B7evB3


And the state is undoubtedly a clean tech hotspot. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 20 minutes outside of Denver, had an economic impact of $814 million on Colorado’s economy in 2012 and has played an outsized role in the plummeting cost of renewables.2
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, December 2012
http://1.usa.gov/19DxTQE
Vestas alone employs over 2,000 Coloradoans at its 4 wind turbine manufacturing plants in-state.3
Source:
Denver Business Journal, March 2014
http://bit.ly/1FLbeNZ
Plus, despite the colder-than-average climate, Colorado is 8th in the U.S. in solar energy generation.4
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1BUohKn


Learn more about Colorado and energy with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Connecticut
ConnecticutConnecticut currently gets less than 5% of its electricity from renewable sources, but it’s not for lack of trying.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, December 2013
http://1.usa.gov/18OrbGr
The state features an array of innovative clean energy programs and pro-renewable policies. And although there is no “low-hanging fruit” for the state’s renewable energy industry,2
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
Connecticut is still poised to foster a booming clean energy economy in the years to come.

Connecticut was one of the pioneers of the “Solarize” program, in which residents can reduce the cost of rooftop solar installations if enough of their neighbors also agree to install solar on their homes. The program has already reached nearly 60 communities.3
Source:
Solarize CT
http://bit.ly/1Bcwwy6
Connecticut is also home to the first Green Bank in the nation, and it has established PACE financing for energy efficiency and distributed renewables.4
Source:
Energize Connecticut
http://bit.ly/1MR3NHo
 On top of all that, Connecticut has a renewable portfolio standard that expects the state to get 20% of its electricity from renewable energy sources by 2020.5
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1OeC3y4


Despite the current lack of utility-scale renewable projects, Connecticut does have a thriving energy efficiency industry. The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy ranked the state 6th in the nation for pro-efficiency policies,6
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
http://bit.ly/1FeGma0
and its energy efficiency programs have reduced retail sales of electricity by 1% in each of the last two years.7
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
http://bit.ly/1xmBrkX

Learn more about energy in Connecticut with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.

Delaware
DelawareAlmost all of Delaware’s electricity comes from coal and natural gas – neither of which is produced in the state.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1C5vbMX
On top of that, less than one-half of electricity sold in Delaware is generated in-state.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/1FRQ8xB
The small state’s dependence on out-of-state energy is one of the reasons it enacted a renewable portfolio standard that mandates 25% of the state’s electricity come from renewables by 2025.3
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1BnVlak


Delaware only has one wind project currently online, a 2 megawatt installation at the University of Delaware.4
Source:
University of Delaware
http://bit.ly/1CKLz7x
Delaware has significantly more offshore wind potential than onshore wind potential,5
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
but an offshore wind energy project has been in limbo off the coast of Delaware for several years now.6
Source:
Bloomberg, October 2012
http://bloom.bg/1Hso0Q6


The state does generate energy from landfill gas,7
Source:
Delaware Business Daily, May 2014
http://bit.ly/1xWMfRr
and pro-solar policies – like a 3.5% carve-out in the state’s RPS – has Delaware’s solar industry set to expand.8
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1N7UW2f
Learn more about energy in Delaware with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Florida
FloridaFlorida is home to a significant amount of both retired New Yorkers and solar energy potential. Unfortunately, the state has a long history of minimal support for clean energy. And some legislation, like rules outlawing power purchase agreements (PPAs), actively discourage the state’s renewable energy industry.1
Source:
Los Angeles Times, August 2014
http://lat.ms/1LPIOru
Only 2% of Florida’s electricity came from renewable sources last year.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1CKQ4iD


Still, the potential for a thriving renewable energy industry remains. Florida isn’t nicknamed “The Sunshine State” for nothing: it has the third highest solar potential in the U.S.3
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1z7M4VG
Despite the negative policy environment, solar energy already supports 4,000 jobs in-state,4
Source:
The Solar Foundation
http://bit.ly/1Hv3XnM
and Florida ranks 7th in the U.S. for utility-scale solar. The state also has significant bioenergy capacity, including an advanced ethanol plant that pumps out 8 million gallons annually in Vero Beach.5
Source:
Ethanol Producer Magazine, September 2014
http://bit.ly/16749tt


At the end of 2014, the state Public Service Commission agreed to gut Florida’s energy efficiency standards and end solar rebates.6
Source:
Tampa Bay Times, November 2014
http://bit.ly/1sdQNpi
So it seems clear that Florida’s clean energy industry will continue to face challenges from legislators and regulators moving forward. That’s a shame: with 32 power plants over 35 years old,7
Source:
Southeastern Wind Coalition, December 2014
http://bit.ly/1IC2N8U
and household electricity expenditures 40% higher than the U.S. average,8
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1CKQ4iD
there is ample opportunity for renewables to improve Florida’s energy infrastructure.

Florida ratepayers are taking matters into their own hands. A bipartisan group of pro-solar activists, led by conservatives inspired by neighbor-state Georgia’s “Green Tea Coalition” is poised to allow voters to decide whether to allow non-utility entities, like homeowners, sell power to the grid.9
Source:
Orlando Sun-Sentinel, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1BKgzVH
Learn more about energy in Florida with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Georgia
GeorgiaGeorgia may not have a renewable portfolio standard, but there are still promising signs for the state’s renewable energy industry. Georgia’s Public Service Commission mandated that Georgia Power have at least 525 megawatts of solar energy capacity by the end of 2015.1
Source:
Atlanta Business Chronicle, December 2013
http://bit.ly/1zR3Qf3
And for its part, Georgia Power expects to have over 800 megawatts of solar power connected to the grid by 2016. This, combined with a net-metering policy, helped make the state the fastest growing solar market in 2013, although growth has since slowed.2
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1BzL5AZ


Likewise, Georgia ranked 3rd in the nation in net electricity generation from biomass in 2013.3
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1CKV5HS
And the state is actually a leader in electric vehicle policy.4
Source:
Wall Street Journal, June 2014
http://on.wsj.com/1BzLSSo
The state provides a significant tax credit for purchasers of EVs and allows electric cars access to high-occupancy carpool lanes during rush hour. Policies like this have made Atlanta the fastest-growing metropolitan market in the country for EV sales.5
Source:
ChargePoint, February 2014
http://bit.ly/1N8e2oQ


Georgia still only gets about 6% of its electricity from renewable sources,6
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1Hvgk32
but the future is unquestionably bright. Learn more about energy in Georgia with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Hawaii
HawaiiGiven its remote location, the lack of domestic fossil fuel resources, and the task of transmitting energy across 5 islands, electrifying Hawaii provides a unique challenge. The archipelago currently generates nearly 3/4ths of its electricity from imported petroleum fuels,1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, December 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1FAEhp4
and as a result, its electricity prices are by far the highest in the U.S. – nearly double that of the second highest, Connecticut.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, December 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1CmyTTZ


Renewable energy is an obvious solution for Hawaii’s energy problems, and the state has made clean energy deployment a priority. In fact, Hawaii's current renewable portfolio standard is 100% by 2045--the only state in the nation to mandate all its electricity come from renewables.3
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/1Qpgmyi
Given the Aloha State’s sunny climate, solar energy – and its potential as a decentralized source of electricity – is particularly attractive. Unsurprisingly, Hawaii’s solar industry is one of the fastest growing in the U.S.4
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1DCXpSJ

Learn more about energy in Hawaii with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.

Idaho

IdahoThanks to its extensive renewable energy resources, Idaho generates most of its electricity from renewables – 70%, to be exact.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1Bpdvsj
Hydropower, in particular, is a significant contributor to the state’s energy portfolio, producing close to half of Idaho’s electricity.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/1EEB9D0


However, the state has much more to offer than hydropower. Idaho’s geothermal energy generation is 6th in the U.S.,3
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1GQqGHc
and its wind energy industry grew by a whopping 35% in 2013.4
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1EOdJO5


Yet, the state has no renewable portfolio standard, no statewide net-metering policy, and moreover, Idaho's public utility commission recently reduced PURPA contracts for renewable energy from 20 years to 2 years.5
Source:
Idaho Statesman, August 2015
http://bit.ly/1YfTYGH
Consequently, Idaho’s clean energy industry is somewhat stalled. Without more adaptive, innovative energy policy, Idaho's energy economy may not exhibit sustained growth moving forward.

Learn more about energy in Idaho with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Illinois
IllinoisAt first look, Illinois wouldn’t appear to hold a lot of promise for clean energy. The state is first in the country in nuclear energy generation and is a leader in coal mining and crude oil refineries.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/19Ne09V
But in fact, Illinois is home to a diverse, thriving renewable energy industry.

Illinois is 2nd in the Midwest in installed renewable energy capacity, trailing only wind behemoth Iowa.2
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, December 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1MmcVlh
It is a top 5 state for installed wind energy and a top 3 state for both ethanol and biodiesel production. Illinois also has several programs designed to promote electricity efficiency within the state.3
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Council, October 2014
http://bit.ly/1FBRvBN
These programs routinely reduce retail sales of electricity by 1%.4
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
http://bit.ly/1xmBrkX


A big reason for the success of renewables in Illinois is the state’s renewable portfolio standard, one of the most advanced in the U.S. It mandates that Illinois gets 25% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2025 and includes a 6% carve-out for solar energy from 2015 on.5 The state’s policy support for renewables has clearly paid off: clean energy supports nearly 100,000 jobs in Illinois.6
Source:
Clean Energy Trust
http://bit.ly/1xvTWDv
Learn more about energy in Illinois with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Indiana
IndianaLike most states in the Midwest, Indiana has bountiful wind resources. The Hoosier State is 13th in the U.S. in installed wind energy capacity, and it is home to 21 industrial plants that manufacture components for wind turbines.1
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1CYhCTh


There are several pro-renewable policies currently in place in Indiana. Renewable energy systems are exempt from property taxes. Certain wind turbine components are exempt from Indiana’s sales tax, and the state has several tax incentives meant to encourage biofuels production.2 That support has paid off: the state is one of the nation’s leading producers of biofuels, pumping out over 1.2 billion gallons per year.3
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1N8hhyz


However, all is not well on the policy front. Indiana also has a renewable portfolio standard, but it is a voluntary standard and partly encompasses non-renewable technologies like nuclear and “clean coal.”4
Source:
DSIRE, August 2014
http://bit.ly/19li0gI
And the state recently repealed “Energizing Indiana,”5
Source:
Indianapolis Business Journal, March 24
http://bit.ly/1FV13qa
its energy efficiency program that supported nearly 1,500 jobs and saved state ratepayers $80 million.6
Source:
Sierra Club, March 2014
http://bit.ly/19ljsQ5
The future of the efficiency industry in Indiana is now unclear. Learn more about energy in Indiana with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Iowa
IowaIowa has a lot of wind and a lot of corn. That’s all the sparsely populated state needs to be a clean energy behemoth.

Iowa doesn’t produce the most wind in the U.S. – it’s third in that regard. But it does lead the U.S. in the portion of its electricity that comes from wind energy. The Hawkeye State gets a whopping 27.4% of its electricity from wind energy alone.1
Source:
American Wind ENergy Association
http://bit.ly/1HEBNDs
It’s no secret why. Iowa has plenty of undeveloped land and wind, and the state used pro-wind policies – like a statewide tax credit for every megawatt generated by wind2
Source:
DSIRE, June 2014
http://bit.ly/1CP67f3
– to turn its significant wind resources into a thriving industry.

It’s not just wind power that’s thriving in Iowa. The state produces 28% of the nation’s ethanol,3
Source:
American Council On Renewable Energy, October 2013
http://bit.ly/18XjGwR
and is home to the first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plant in the country.4
Source:
Des Moines Register, September 2014
http://dmreg.co/1ETGTeI
In fact, the renewable fuels industry supports 73,371 jobs in-state and was responsible for nearly $20 billion of economic activity, according to Fuels America.5
Source:
Fuels America
http://bit.ly/19lnbNE
Learn more about energy in Iowa with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Kansas
KansasWind energy potential in Kansas is second in the U.S., trailing only Texas.1
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
So it should come as no surprise that the wind industry in Kansas is a crucial part of its energy economy. 19.5% of the state’s electricity comes from wind power, and the industry has created over 10,000 jobs in the state.2
Source:
Kansas Energy Information Network, February 2014
http://bit.ly/1OyURbi


Kansas is also one of the 10 sunniest states in the U.S., but its solar industry has yet to get off the ground. More successful is its renewable fuels industry. Kansas is home to one of only three plants in the country that use crop waste to produce ethanol at a commercial scale.3
Source:
Huffington Post, October 2014
http://huff.to/1EG7ZmU
And the biofuels industry supports 16,620 jobs in-state, according to Fuels America.4
Source:
Fuels America
http://bit.ly/19lnbNE


Kansas’ renewable portfolio standard mandates that 20% of the state’s peak electricity demand be met by renewables by 2020.5
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1GUShXM
Fossil fuel groups have targeted that RPS, but so far those efforts have failed.6
Source:
Topeka Capital-Journal, March 2014
http://bit.ly/1OyV5iX


Learn more about energy in Kansas with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Kentucky
KentuckyIt should come as no surprise that Kentucky has almost no renewable energy infrastructure to speak of. The state alone is responsible for nearly 9% of U.S. coal production,1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1vVDsS4
and is the third largest exporter of coal in the U.S.2
Source:
Union of Concerned Scientists, January 2014
http://bit.ly/1zBUqpw


The state’s second largest source of energy is hydropower. And it does feature several tax credits for renewables, as well a net-metering policy. But utilities have the ability to cap net-metering intake at 1% of their total generation.3
Source:
Kentucky Legislature
http://1.usa.gov/1DhRe6E
The fact is, in Kentucky, coal is king: 92% of its electricity comes from coal.

The state’s politics are singularly focused on protecting the coal industry.4
Source:
Politico, December 2014
http://politi.co/1BogvGp
This is a problem; coal plants across the country face shutdowns in the coming years thanks to the plummeting costs of renewable energy, new regulations protecting the environment, and abundant natural gas. Kentucky has 28,588 megawatts of potential wind capacity,5
Source:
Southeastern Wind Coalition, December 2014
http://bit.ly/1GhNnog
so it can transition to a clean energy economy and ensure future generations of Kentuckians can find work in the state. But without a renewable portfolio standard, it’s hard to see how. Learn more about energy in Kentucky with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Louisiana
LouisianaLouisiana is a fossil fuel powerhouse, with a litany of oil refineries, pipelines, and offshore drilling platforms off its coast in the Gulf of Mexico.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2015
http://1.usa.gov/12S6S7U
But all of that industrial infrastructure also makes Louisiana a major consumer of energy, which has spurred the state to start supporting renewables. And recent environmental disasters, like the BP oil spill and the loss of thousands of miles of Louisiana’s coast to rising sea levels,2
Source:
Pro Publica, August 2014
http://bit.ly/1x6Oky1
have also made the state keenly aware of the perils of carbon-intensive energy.

Louisiana added 10 megawatts of solar energy in the first half of 2014 on the strength of a supportive net-metering policy and pro-solar tax credits.3
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1zc3lgc
This rapid growth has made Louisiana one of the hottest solar markets in the U.S. The state also boasts a strong bioenergy industry with some of the highest biomass potential in the U.S.4
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory
http://bit.ly/1GhZ7He
That potential is paying off: NFR BioEnergy recently announced a $312 million investment in 10 new biorefineries across the state.5
Source:
New Orleans Times-Picayune
http://bit.ly/1HGZrm8
The refineries will support 450 direct jobs at annual salaries averaging $54,000. Learn more about energy in Louisiana with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Maine
MaineMaine has a lot of renewable energy potential, particularly in wind energy, hydropower, and biomass. And the state is already taking advantage of that potential: over half of Maine’s electricity comes from renewables, and it boasts the lowest electricity prices in the northeastern U.S.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1HHZKgt


Maine is home to the first grid-connected offshore wind turbine in the country – which is also the first floating wind turbine in the country.2
Source:
NBC - Portland, September 2014
http://on.wcsh6.com/18Yy2gF
The project is one example of what could be a thriving industry, although maneuvering by Governor Paul LePage has throttled the state’s offshore wind industry and sent investment out-of-state.3
Source:
Portland Press-Herald, July 2014
http://bit.ly/1bv84D3
However, Maine’s onshore wind industry has continued to grow, and is now poised to create 4,200 jobs this year.4
Source:
Maine Center for Business and Economic Research, December 2014
http://bit.ly/1s51qKF


Maine’s biomass industry accounts for over 20% of the state’s electricity, which is by far the largest share from biomass in the country.5
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, December 2013
http://1.usa.gov/1CZNTt3
That’s part of the reason the state has already met its renewable portfolio standard, which mandated the state get 40% of its electricity from renewables by 2017.6
Source:
DSIRE, September 2014
http://bit.ly/18YACDi


Learn more about energy in Maine with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Maryland
MarylandMaryland’s renewable portfolio standard mandates that the state get 20% of its electricity from renewables by 2022, and includes carve-outs for solar and offshore wind.1
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1GoVyk8
Renewables currently account for 7% of electricity in the state.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1BpBWH2


Western Maryland has significant wind energy potential, as does the state’s coast. In fact, the development of Maryland’s offshore wind industry would create 7,000 jobs in-state, 4,000 more than offshore drilling would.3
Source:
Oceana, December 2014
http://bit.ly/1FW23KD


Maryland participates in the Northeast’s Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a regional cap-and-trade program that has used its proceeds to invest nearly $200 million in Maryland's clean energy industry so far.4
Source:
Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, February 2014
http://bit.ly/1CrkhCQ


Learn more about energy in Maryland with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Massachusetts
MassachusettsClean energy only makes up 9.3% of Massachusetts’ electricity portfolio,1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1CQgbo7
but the industry is set to grow significantly thanks to a litany of pro-renewable policies. The Bay State is home to one of the most innovative renewable portfolio standards in the U.S.; it mandates that Massachusetts utilities increase the portion of the electricity they generate from renewables by 1% every year.2
Source:
DSIRE, October 2014
http://bit.ly/1xhCpi9
The American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy ranked Massachusetts as the best state in the country for policies that encourage energy efficiency for two straight years,3
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, October 2014
http://bit.ly/1NanaeC
and the state has deployment goals for both solar and wind.4
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, December 2013
http://1.usa.gov/18YG5ds


Massachusetts is not a particularly sunny state, and it does not have exceptional solar power potential.5
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
But pro-solar policies have made the state 6th in the U.S. for installed solar capacity, and the industry supported 9,400 jobs in-state in 2014.6
Source:
The Solar Foundation, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1y9GOPg


Massachusetts has also been on the precipice of featuring the first utility-scale offshore wind installation in the country. But the Cape Wind project, which was expected to support up to 1,000 jobs,7
Source:
Cape Wind
http://bit.ly/1GX1G11
is now in limbo after two utilities withdrew their support.8
Source:
Boston Globe, January 2015
http://bit.ly/1xEzfTM
Its future is uncertain.

Learn more about energy in Massachusetts with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Michigan
MichiganMichigan has a wealth of renewable energy resources, and the potential of Michigan’s clean energy industry is high – though as of yet, unmet.

Michigan does have a renewable portfolio standard, but it’s one of the weakest in the U.S.1
Source:
DSIRE, October 2014
http://bit.ly/1HIyUBo
It mandates that all utilities in-state get 10% of their electricity from renewable sources by the end of this year. That’s an underwhelming goal: research suggests that the state can get 32.5% of its electricity from renewables by 2030 with negligible cost increases.2
Source:
Union of Concerned Scientists, March 2014
http://bit.ly/19mstZ8
  Research from the Michigan Public Service Commission also shows a higher portfolio standard is demonstrably achievable.3
Source:
Michigan Energy Office, September 2013
http://1.usa.gov/1xAjHCM


Taking advantage of its extensive renewable energy resources would also keep money in-state; the Wolverine State currently sends over $1 billion out-of-state every year for coal.4
Source:
Union of Concerned Scientists, August 2014
http://bit.ly/1zBUqpw
And there are plenty of resources to take advantage of. Michigan has over 19 million acres of forestry for biomass.5
Source:
U.S. Department of Agriculture
http://1.usa.gov/1FW4Un3
Plus, its wind industry has started to soar: last year, it passed biomass as Michigan's largest source of renewable electricity,6
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1NhIf52
and from 2007 to 2011, the state’s wind capacity increased 1000-fold.7
Source:
Detroit Free Press, July 2014
http://bit.ly/1GX7hVj


Seizing on this success, Republican Governor Rick Snyder recently unveiled an ambitious plan for Michigan to get 40% of its electricity from renewables by 2030.8
Source:
The Detroit News, March 2015
http://bit.ly/1O0DYGk


Learn more about energy in Michigan with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Minnesota
MinnesotaLike several states in the Midwest, Minnesota is a veritable wind energy leader. 98 wind farms – most of them centered in the southwestern corner of the state – provide 15% of Minnesota’s electricity and have made the state 7th in the country for installed wind capacity.1
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1HIoxRE


Minnesota is also a leader in renewable fuels. The state produces the 4th-most biofuels in the country,2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, February 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1bvywwd
and the state’s economy has prospered as a result: renewable fuels are responsible for $11 billion of economic activity and support nearly 50,000 jobs in-state according to Fuels America.3
Source:
Fuels America
http://bit.ly/19lnbNE


But it’s not just wind and biofuels taking off in Minnesota. Despite bordering Canada, Minnesota’s solar industry is growing at a rapid pace.4
Source:
Minneapolis Star-Tribune, August 2014
http://strib.mn/1xhFQp3


All of this couldn’t have happened without policy support at the state level. Minnesota boasts an instructive renewable portfolio standard (with a solar carve-out of 1.5%)5
Source:
DSIRE, October 2014
http://bit.ly/1EVX7UI
as well as sales tax exemptions and production tax credits for renewables. It even has it’s own renewable fuel standard for biodiesel.6
Source:
Minnesota Legislature
http://bit.ly/1NhM8XK
Pro-renewable policies like these – and many more – are part of the reason Minnesota can boast a thriving, diverse clean energy industry.

Learn more about energy in Minnesota with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Mississippi
MississippiMississippi is one of only three states without a renewable portfolio standard, net metering policy, or interconnection standards.1 As such, it is annually among the states that generate the least amount of renewable energy.

This is not for lack of potential. In fact, if hydropower generation capabilities were added to existing locks and dams in Mississippi, they would generate up to 271 megawatts of renewable energy.2
Source:
U.S. Department of Energy
http://1.usa.gov/1wlCi4z
And according to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the state ranks 11th in the U.S. in biopower potential and has the ability to develop a small offshore wind industry.3
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
But with such a lack of pro-renewable policies, it’s hard to see how the state will attract the investment necessary to build those industries.

Learn more about energy in Mississippi with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Missouri
MissouriMissouri has above average potential in many renewable technologies, including wind, solar, biomass, hydropower, and geothermal.1
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
Despite that, only 3% of Missouri’s electricity comes from renewables, and the state has yet to develop all of its hydropower resources.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, February 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1EHvmMV
The state also sends $1.4 billion per year to import coal from out-of-state.3
Source:
Union of Concerned Scientists, August 2014
http://bit.ly/1zBUqpw
That’s the fourth-most in the country.

With that being said, the clean energy industry has slowly begun to ramp up. There are 800 megawatts of wind energy currently under development in the state.4
Source:
Natural Resources Defense Council
http://on.nrdc.org/1IztDgL
That would increase Missouri’s installed wind capacity by 261%.5
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1xiA7PF
And the state does have a renewable portfolio standard in place. Missouri’s renewable portfolio standard mandates that utilities get 15% of their electricity from renewables by 2021; it includes a 2% solar carve-out.6
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1bxXACJ


Learn more about energy in Missouri with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Montana
MontanaWith plentiful open space and a significant amount of waterways, Montana has ample renewable energy potential. The state derived 37% of its electricity from hydropower in 2013,1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1ydN3la
and Northwestern Energy, Montana’s largest utility, recently bought all 11 of Montana’s hydropower dams from their Pennsylvania owners.2
Source:
The Missoulian, September 2014
http://bit.ly/19nGExk
The deal will help Northwestern get more than half of its energy from wind and hydro.

Speaking of wind energy, Montana’s wind resources rank third in the U.S.3
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1EYpHF5
But even with 20 MW of new wind capacity added in 2014, Montana ranks just 15th in the U.S. in installed wind capacity.4
Source:
Montana Department of Environmental Quality
http://1.usa.gov/1Yg0hdy
 Still, there are positive signs that the state’s wind energy industry is trending upward – Montana increased wind energy generation by 32% in 2013 alone.5
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, August 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1OB3fHv


Learn more about energy in Montana with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Nebraska
NebraskaNebraska has the potential to be a renewable energy powerhouse  and in some sense, it already is. After all, the state is 2nd in the country for biofuels production capacity.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, January 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1EHyxo2
The renewable fuels industry has provided a big boost to Nebraska’s rural economy according to the biofuels group Fuels America, supporting nearly 40,000 jobs and spurring economic activity upwards of $11 billion.2
Source:
Fuels America
http://bit.ly/19lnbNE
Nebraska did have several tax incentives in place for advanced biofuels, but those incentives have since expired.3
Source:
Nebraska Department of Revenue
http://1.usa.gov/1xCkzXy


Nebraska is also 4th in wind power potential.4
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1zaqYYE
In fact, almost 92% of the state is suitable for wind energy generation.5
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, January 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1EHyxo2
But the state has lagged in taking advantage of its abundant wind resources. Nebraska has less than 900 megawatts of wind energy capacity; that makes the state just 18th in the country for installed wind capacity.6
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1Cs0EdV


State politicians are working on boosting its renewable sector. Nebraska does not have a renewable portfolio standard, but a bill to provide a production tax credit for wind installations is currently working its way through the legislature.7
Source:
Fox Business, January 2015
http://fxn.ws/1xClnvt


Learn more about energy in Nebraska with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Nevada
NevadaNevada is one of the most exciting states in the U.S. when it comes to clean energy development and deployment. Strong policies – a robust 25% by 2025 Renewable Portfolio Standard (5% of which is solar), a strong net-metering policy, and tax incentives for renewable energy projects1 have helped Nevada develop a thriving and diverse renewable energy industry.

Nevada is among the U.S. leaders in geothermal potential, and so far, the state has delivered: it’s second in the U.S. in geothermal capacity, leading the third state, Utah, by nearly 500 megawatts.2
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, July 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1GQqGHc
It is also home to cutting edge waste-to-energy aviation biofuels plant outside Reno,3
Source:
Reno Gazette-Journal, September 2014
http://on.rgj.com/1NjSaqU
and it is 5th in the U.S. in installed solar energy capacity. In 2014, alone, Nevada installed 339 MW of solar energy.4
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1Cy9ebo
According to the Nevada Public Utilities Commission, all of the distributed solar in Nevada brings benefits in excess of $36 million to the state’s grid.5
Source:
Nevada Public Utilities Commission, July 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1rzVXuZ


Nevada’s investment in renewables paid off when Tesla chose the state as the site for its famed “gigafactory.” The automobile manufacturer’s battery plant is expected to employ 6,500 people and generate $100 billion of economic activity for the state.6
Source:
Los Angeles Times, September 2014
http://lat.ms/1BsBAyi
Tesla chose Nevada in part because of the state’s commitment to clean energy.

Learn more about energy in Nevada with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
New Hampshire
New HampshireIn 2013, 16% of New Hampshire’s electricity came from renewable sources.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1BsCwTl
Most of the state’s current renewable energy capacity comes from a mixture of hydropower and biomass, although the state does feature some wind power as well.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, December 2013
http://1.usa.gov/1NjVOAT
New Hampshire’s reliance on renewables fits in with its goal of getting 24.8% of its electricity from renewables by 2025 – over half of which has to have been added after 2006.3
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1Cs47ZL


Despite the state’s commitment to clean energy, renewables have been the subject of fierce debate lately. Some residents have pushed for a ban on wind energy installations, although the legislature rejected a wind power moratorium last year.4
Source:
Concord Monitor, January 2014
http://bit.ly/1FXtmo0
There is also a debate over whether to allow hydropower generated in Canada to qualify for the state’s renewable portfolio standard.5
Source:
New Hampshire Public Radio, January 2015
http://bit.ly/1yejf7M


Learn more about energy in New Hampshire with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
New Jersey

New HampshireNew Jersey is the leading example for how pro-renewable policies can foster a thriving industry in states without exceptional clean energy potential. The fourth smallest state in the U.S. has only average solar potential, but that hasn’t stopped it from adding the third-most solar energy capacity in the U.S.1

Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, December 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1MmcVlh
Backed by a supportive net-metering policy, a renewable portfolio standard with a solar carve-out, solar renewable energy credits, and sales tax exemptions for solar energy equipment,2 the solar industry supported 7,200 jobs and 509 solar companies in New Jersey last year.3
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1CS8E8s


New Jersey has also long been considered a leader in offshore wind policy, although recent developments have cast doubt on the future of offshore wind in the state. In 2010, Governor Chris Christie signed the Offshore Wind Economic Development Act, legislation that provided financial support and tax incentives for offshore wind projects.4
Source:
Newark Star-Ledger, August 2010
http://bit.ly/1Cs5Xdl
The bill also mandated that New Jersey connect 1,100 megawatts of offshore wind power to the grid by 2021.5
Source:
DSIRE, March 2013
http://bit.ly/1byoIBQ


A pilot installation off the coast of Atlantic City was set to create 500 jobs in South Jersey and establish New Jersey as the nation’s hub for offshore wind energy.6
Source:
South Jersey Times, October 2014
http://bit.ly/1rgY5B9
But the Board of Public Utilities has consistently blocked the project from moving forward, and its future is unclear.7
Source:
Bloomberg, November 2014
http://bloom.bg/1CS9t16


Learn more about energy in New Jersey with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.

New Mexico
New MexicoWith its high temperatures and vast expanses of arid land, it’s no surprise that New Mexico is a solar energy leader. The state has enough solar energy installed to power 74,000 homes, and the solar industry in New Mexico employs 1,600 residents.1
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1M7qUQV
New Mexico’s thriving solar industry is largely a result of early support for the technology.

New Mexico has also been a significant adopter of wind energy, with over 750 MW of wind energy capacity already deployed2
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1Gwu4cl
and several hundred megawatts more under construction. New Mexico’s burgeoning clean energy industry is thanks in part to its wide portfolio of clean energy tax credits, including for both project development and manufacturing.3 Those tax incentives helped attract $585 million in clean energy investment in 2013.4
Source:
American Council On Renewable Energy, September 2014
http://bit.ly/1EHWLyk
Also contributing to New Mexico's clean energy industry: it's strong renewable portfolio standard of 20% by 2020.5
Source:
New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
http://bit.ly/1QpoC1j


Learn more about energy in New Mexico with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
New York
New YorkNew York has a diverse and thriving renewable energy industry. 23% of New York’s electricity came from renewables in 2013, and the state produces more hydropower than any state east of the Rocky Mountains.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1bz6rUK
New York is also a top 10 state in installed capacity for both solar power and biopower,2
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, December 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1MmcVlh
and the state has enough wind power installed to power 327,000 homes.3
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1Bt1P7R


New York’s booming renewable energy sector is thanks in large part to an array of supportive policies and innovative programs. The American Council for an Energy Efficiency Economy ranked New York 7th in the U.S. for pro-efficiency policies,4
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, December 2014
http://bit.ly/1FXYMKN
and the state’s clean energy authority has saved New York ratepayers $6.8 billion through energy efficiency financing.5 In 2013, Governor Andrew Cuomo created a Green Bank that would leverage $1 billion in financing to spur private investment in the state’s clean energy sector.6
Source:
Bloomberg, September 2013
http://bloom.bg/1Nfb0RS


New York’s renewable portfolio standard mandates that the state get 29% of its electricity from renewable sources by the end of this year.7
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1HNOejC


Learn more about energy in New York with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
North Carolina
North CarolinaNorth Carolina is a solar energy leader in the U.S. -- and a preview of what southeastern states can accomplish with strong policy support for renewables. The state is fourth in the country in installed solar capacity, and it added the 2nd-most solar last year.1
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/1HR47m6
North Carolina is now on track to get 20% of its electricity from solar power by 2030,2
Source:
Environment North Carolina, November 2014
http://bit.ly/1bzbSmG
and solar currently supports 5,600 direct jobs in the state.3
Source:
The Solar Foundation, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1CspJ8w


The rapid growth of the solar industry in North Carolina is thanks to a litany of policy mechanisms enacted by the state to support its renewable energy industry. Not only is North Carolina one of the few states in southeast with a renewable portfolio standard, but its RPS contains an 0.8% carve-out for solar.4
Source:
DSIRE, February 2015
http://bit.ly/1FY0ZG4
North Carolina also has several state tax incentive meant to support renewable energy installations and manufacturers.

That policy support has paid off. Clean energy supported over 22,000 jobs in North Carolina last year.5
Source:
NC Sustainable Energy Association, February 2015
http://bit.ly/190yDhN


Learn more about energy in North Carolina with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
North Dakota
North DakotaNorth Dakota’s wind energy industry has a lot of potential; it ranks 6th in the U.S. in that regard.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, February 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1FOP7Ia
And the state has been taking advantage. Over 15% of North Dakota’s electricity came from wind energy in 2013.2
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1D3YPWE
That’s important for this notoriously energy-intensive state -- although it is sparsely populated, long winters and a booming energy production industry have made North Dakota the 4th most energy-intensive state on a per-capita basis.3
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/19oI8Hs


A large reason for the development of wind power in North Dakota is the array of pro-renewable policies in the state. Despite a voluntary renewable portfolio standard that has already been met (and ends this year), the state offers a tax credit for renewable projects,4
Source:
DSIRE, March 2015
http://bit.ly/1BwIdkm
along with property tax abatements and reductions for renewable projects.

It’s not all wind energy in North Dakota. The state also gets 5% of its electricity from hydropower.5
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, December 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1MmcVlh
It remains to be seen just how much the clean energy industry will grow in the state, but the early returns are undoubtedly promising.

Learn more about energy in North Dakota with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Ohio
OhioUp until 2014, Ohio’s clean energy industry was saving money for consumers and creating jobs in the process. Ohio led the U.S. in manufacturers of wind turbine components and was 2nd in total solar equipment providers.1
Source:
Pew Charitable Trusts, January 2015
http://bit.ly/1OBS8Ot
In 2014, the solar industry supported nearly 3,800 jobs in-state.2
Source:
Solar Energy Industries Association
http://bit.ly/19oKJ4e
And the state’s energy efficiency program was on pace to save Ohio ratepayers $5.6 billion by 2020.3
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, April 2013
http://bit.ly/1H2R6G2


But the state legislature froze Ohio’s successful renewable energy and energy efficiency standards in 2014,4
Source:
Columbus Business First, June 2014
http://bit.ly/1BtflIF
even though they had reduced electricity bills in the state by 1.4% from 2008 to 2012.5
Source:
Union of Concerned Scientists
http://bit.ly/1CfBpdd


Despite the intense popularity of the standards – Ohio voters supported them by a ratio of nearly 3-16
Source:
Columbus Dispatch, April 2014
http://bit.ly/1z60OSN
– Governor John Kasich signed the bill repealing the state’s clean energy standards. This was before an administration-funded report came to light that showed renewables supported more jobs (31,000) in Ohio than previously thought.7
Source:
Columbus Dispatch, November 2014
http://bit.ly/1xeKKQV


Ohio currently gets a minimal amount of its electricity from renewable sources.8
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2015
http://1.usa.gov/1HOOL54
And with the intense uncertainty surrounding the state’s energy policies, it’s unlikely that will change.

Learn more about energy in Ohio with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Oklahoma
OklahomaOklahoma can’t claim many significantly developed renewable energy resources outside of wind energy, but the state’s wind industry is unquestionably one of the strongest in the U.S.

Thanks to 29 wind farms concentrated in the western half of the state, Oklahoma generates the 4th most electricity from wind energy in the country,1
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1HYizZq
and wind power makes up 15% of the state’s electricity portfolio – enough to meet Oklahoma’s renewable portfolio standard. Wind energy is a big reason why Oklahoma boasts some of the cheapest electricity prices in the nation.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/1H6EBZZ


All of that wind power comes with tangible economic benefits: wind power supports over 1,600 jobs in Oklahoma.3
Source:
The Oklahoman, March 2014
http://bit.ly/1IEs6pA
This reliance on wind energy delivers more than jobs in wind turbine manufacturing and installation. The state’s intense wind deployment has also driven job growth in the nascent renewable energy storage industry.4
Source:
Tulsa World, January 2015
http://bit.ly/1D73WVS


The good news is that more wind power is on the way. The state’s wind energy capacity is set to grow by 67% over the first half of this year as more installations come online.5
Source:
NPR, December 2014
http://n.pr/1xkxCfQ
The bad news is that, outside of some hydropower, Oklahoma’s solar and biopower potential has yet to be developed in any meaningful capacity.

Learn more about energy in Oklahoma with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Oregon
OregonOregon is truly a leader in clean energy deployment and investment. The state gets over 70% of its electricity from renewable sources, close to 60% of which comes from hydropower.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/1Bu6qXv
But that hasn’t stopped it from continuing to invest in clean energy industries: Oregon received the first FERC license awarded to a wave energy project in the U.S.2
Source:
U.S. Department of Energy, August 2012
http://1.usa.gov/1FSAaoy


Oregon is home to one of the largest wind farms in the U.S.,3
Source:
U.S. Department of Energy
http://1.usa.gov/19500Yd
and the state has installed over 3,000 MW of wind energy capacity to date.4
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1950rSc
Oregon is also poised to begin generating power from floating offshore wind turbines,5
Source:
Los Angeles Times, February 2014
http://lat.ms/1F1GZRL
and is experimenting with a solar feed in-tariff program, in which solar generators receive a fixed incentive per kW/h produced for a set number of years.6
Source:
The Oregonian, March 2014
http://bit.ly/1D7aJiz
Worth noting, the state's geothermal resource potential ranks third in the country. 7
Source:
American Council On Renewable Energy, Novemver 2015
http://bit.ly/1QppNxu


Learn more about energy in Oregon with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Pennsylvania
PennsylvaniaCoal has generally been the dominant source of energy in Pennsylvania – the state produces the 4th most coal in the country.1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, March 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1McSwUO
But that is slowly changing thanks to a slew of pro-renewable policies, steady growth in the clean energy sector, and a Governor supportive of clean energy.

Wind power is the largest source of renewable energy in Pennsylvania, although the state also generates electricity from hydropower and biomass.2
Source:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, December 2014
http://1.usa.gov/1MmcVlh
Pennsylvania’s established manufacturing base has turned it into a leader in the production of wind turbine components; there are 28 facilities that manufacture components for the wind industry in the state.3
Source:
American Wind Energy Association
http://bit.ly/1OEh0oG


Pennsylvania does not have a renewable portfolio standard, but it does have an alternative portfolio standard that includes an 8% carve-out for renewable sources.4
Source:
DSIRE, September 2014
http://bit.ly/1HZ2xP4


Learn more about energy in Pennsylvania with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Rhode Island
Rhode IslandDespite some of the lowest per-capita electricity usage in the country,1
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration, December 2013
http://1.usa.gov/1H7gAln
Rhode Island’s electricity prices are among the highest in the United States.2
Source:
U.S. Energy Information Administration
http://1.usa.gov/1EJoAGz
Virtually all of the state’s electricity is generated by natural gas produced out-of-state.3
Source:
American Council On Renewable Energy, June 2014
http://bit.ly/1IEUisl


The state has taken steps to reduce electricity costs and develop its domestic energy industry. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy ranks Rhode Island 3rd for policies that encourage energy efficiency,4
Source:
American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, October 2014
http://bit.ly/1Gxshnv
and it has invested proceeds from a regional cap-and-trade initiative in efficiency programs.5
Source:
Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, February 2014
http://bit.ly/1CrkhCQ


And Rhode Island’s renewable energy industry is starting to ramp up. State legislators are interested in expanding a program that supports distributed generation from renewables in the state.6
Source:
Providence Journal, March 2014
http://bit.ly/1H7Dg51
The first offshore wind turbines in the country are poised to commence construction off the coast of Block Island, a popular destination for tourists.7
Source:
Rhode Island Public Radio, November 2014
http://bit.ly/1OEUmwA


Learn more about energy in Rhode Island with ACORE’s Renewable Energy in the 50 States.
Friday, 11 July 2014 11:48
When it was completed in 2013, the London Array was the largest offshore wind farm in the world, designed to produce a gigawatt of electricity. In April of this year, Google GOOGL +0.67% announced that it had contracted for that much renewable energy over the course of seven different purchase agreements since 2011—the largest one being the most recent purchase agreement for 407 megawatts of wind-sourced power from MidAmerican Energy Company to supply its data center in Council Bluffs, Iowa. One gigawatt was almost 20 percent of the wind power capacity for the whole state of Iowa in 2013, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. Renewable energy seems like a natural solution for data centers, which are notoriously electricity hungry. Not surprisingly, the purchase of large contracts and certificates by big tech companies to green their images is driving a new wave of interest in renewable energy. But will utilities need to significantly expand their capacity to meet this demand?

Additional Info

  • Byline Source Forbes
  • URL http://onforb.es/1oGZ9P6
Published in Latest News
Monday, 14 July 2014 10:26
The Iowa Supreme Court ruled today that a local solar energy company did not act as a public utility when it attempted to enter a third-party power purchase agreement with the city of Dubuque. In a split decision, the court ruled, 4-2, with one abstention, in favor of Eagle Point Solar, filing as SZ Enterprises, against the Iowa Utilities Board. The court found that the power purchase agreement (PPA) didn’t infringe on Alliant Energy’s exclusive operating area.

Additional Info

  • Byline Source Telegraph-Herald
  • URL http://bit.ly/1tvdULO
Published in Latest News
Thursday, 04 September 2014 10:59
A federally-backed facility in Iowa started producing ethanol from corn waste products Wednesday, becoming the first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plant in the country to use corn waste.

Additional Info

  • Byline Source The Hill
  • URL http://bit.ly/1rO7WFn
Published in Latest News
Friday, 12 September 2014 11:37
Iowa is leading the nation when it comes to renewable energy. We already generate more of our power from wind — 27 percent — than any other state. In fact, we're on track to get as much as 50 percent of our power from wind by 2017. And last year, Iowa produced two times more biofuels than any other state — more than a quarter of the biofuels produced nationwide.

Additional Info

  • Byline Source Des Moines Register
  • URL http://dmreg.co/X6z0RW
Published in Latest News
Monday, 15 September 2014 11:43
This month, our company, Quad County Corn Processors, will debut an innovative new technology that promises to make one of Iowa's signature agricultural products — corn — go even further.

Additional Info

  • Byline Source Des Moines Register
  • URL http://dmreg.co/1qWxQDj
Published in Latest News
Friday, 03 October 2014 13:57
A group representing 33 state governors asked the administration to increase the blending mandates for biodiesel and a certain kind of ethanol.

Additional Info

  • Byline Source The Hill
  • URL http://bit.ly/1pLpJFN
Published in Latest News
Friday, 03 October 2014 14:00
The Clean Power Plan will help tackle climate change by bringing existing power plants up to modern standards. Currently, coal-fired power plants in the United States emit as much carbon dioxide as all the nation's cars, trucks and planes combined. Encouraging renewable energy development will result in business growth, job creation, cleaner air and a quicker path to energy independence.

Additional Info

  • Byline Source Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel
  • URL http://bit.ly/1tmWOde
Published in Latest News
Wednesday, 05 March 2014 19:00
27%: Iowa residences powered by wind energy

Additional Info

  • Stat 27%
  • URL http://bit.ly/1e5cued
  • URL-label http://bit.ly/1e5cued
  • Source Business Council for Sustainable Energy
Published in Key Stats
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